Clay Siegall: The Man Who Is Looking To Make Cancer Treatment Humane and Effective

Clay Siegall has always been interested in medicine and healing people through using technology combined with targeted treatments. He witnessed, first-hand, the brutality of current cancer treatment regimens and decided that he wanted to do something to change the way that cancer was dealt with. He decided early on in life that he would combine business with medicine to create a company that would earn a profit by treating people’s cancer in a humane and effective way. Today, his company, Seattle Genetics, earns money by selling its own proprietary drugs and forming partnerships with production companies.

Clay Siegall has commented that he got the company’s first sell simply through selling what it had to offer. He credits his amazing sales team for a lot of the company’s early success. Now, with excellent offerings, the company spends lots of time with wining and dining its clients, because the deals it makes are large ones and these take lots of time to negotiate.

Clay Siegall is a Ph.D and CEO of Seattle Genetics, the company that he, himself, founded in 1998 to create therapeutic drugs that target the kinds of diseases that have not been able to be treated successfully in many years. He attended the University of Maryland where he earned a Bachelor’s of Science in zoology, and he also studied at George Washington University where he earned his Ph.D in genetics. By working on antibody-drug conjugates, Seattle Genetics has made its way to the top of its industry. In 2011, the company, under Siegall’s leadership, was able to secure FDA approval of its drug ADCETRIS, which is now approved in countries all over the world.

Clay Siegall previously worked with the National Cancer Institute and Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute. He has been honored with a spread of awards that include

the 2012 Pacific Northwest Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year and the 2013 University of Maryland Alumnus of the Year for Computer, Math, and Natural Sciences. As an author, he has published more than 70 different works and as an entrepreneur, he has had 15 patents approved. He believes that chemotherapy is an outdated treatment for cancer and that new, targeted therapies are on the way that will work much better.